Bringing Up Baby (1938)

 ●  English ● 1 hr 42 mins

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Colourful and charming, this hilarious Romantic comedy revolves around the misadventures of the mild-mannered palaeontologist Dr. David Huxley. Both his professional and personal life are at a peak, and he is excited by the news that an intercostal clavicle bone has been found to complete his brontosaurus skeleton, a project four years in the construction. He is equally excited about his imminent marriage to his assistant, the officious Alice Swallow, who is interested in him more for his work than for him as a person. David needs the $1 million endowment of wealthy dowager Mrs. Carleton Random to complete the project. Her lawyer, Alexander Peabody, will make the decision on her behalf, so David needs to get in his favor. However, whenever David tries to make a good impression on Peabody, the same young woman always seems to do something to make him look bad. She is the flighty heiress Susan Vance, and her entry into this life is enough to send him on a dizzying rollercoaster ride of misadventures, love being the most dangerous of them!
See Storyline (May Contain Spoilers)

Cast: Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn

Crew: Howard Hawks (Director), Russell Metty (Director of Photography), Roy Webb (Music Director)

Rating: U (India)

Genres: Comedy, Romance

Release Dates: 18 Feb 1938 (India)

Tagline: And so begins the hilarious adventure of Professor David Huxley and Miss Susan Vance, a flutter-brained vixen with love in her heart! [Theatrical trailer.]

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Did you know? The movie's shoot got frequently delayed due to uncontrollable laughing fits between Hepburn and Grant. Read More
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Film Type:
Feature
Language:
English
Colour Info:
Black & White
Sound Mix:
Mono
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
2.35:1, 1.37:1
Stereoscopy:
No
Taglines:
And so begins the hilarious adventure of Professor David Huxley and Miss Susan Vance, a flutter-brained vixen with love in her heart! [Theatrical trailer.]
Goofs:
Crew/Equipment Visible
In the scene Susan is in her apartment and tells David she thinks he's "found a real friend" in Baby, a wire briefly falls into the view of the mirror in the background.

Crew/Equipment Visible
In the scene while Applegate and Gogarty find the leopard, you can see the shadow of the leopard's trainer come into camera, for just a second, as the leopard moves forward.

Audio/Video Mismatch
In the scene while Susan hits the back of the truck, the sounds of geese squawking can be heard while it's chickens flying out of the containers.

Crew/Equipment Visible
In the scene while Susan follows Fritz into the house, the shadow of the boom mic can be seen against the wall of the house.

Character Error
When Susan says her brother trapped Baby while he was hunting in Brazil. There are no leopards in Brazil. There are, however, jaguars.
Trivia:
Before the release of this film Cary Grant had been worried that he might never become a major star after all, since he was already nearly 34 at the time of filming and younger actors like Errol Flynn and James Stewart were established stars.

The movie's shoot got frequently delayed due to uncontrollable laughing fits between Hepburn and Grant.

A tame leopard was used for the shooting; its trainer was off-screen with a whip for all its scenes.

There is no musical score for the film, with the only exception of the opening and end titles.

This is the second movie of four movies pairing Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn.

Cary Grant was not fond of the leopard that was used in the film. Once, to torture him, Katharine Hepburn put a stuffed leopard through a vent in the top of his dressing room. "He was out of there like lightning," wrote Hepburn in her autobiography Me: Stories of My Life.

Howard Hawks modeled Cary Grant's character, David, on silent film comedian Harold Lloyd, even having Grant wear glasses just like the comedian.