Trumbo (2016)

 ●  English ● 2 hrs 4 mins

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In 1947, successful screenwriter Dalton Trumbo and other Hollywood figures get blacklisted for their political beliefs.

Cast: Bryan Cranston, Diane Lane, Helen Mirren

Crew: Jay Roach (Director), Jim Denault (Director of Photography), Theodore Shapiro (Music Director)

Genres: Drama, Biography

Release Dates: 12 Feb 2016 (India), 25 Feb 2016 (Singapore), 25 Feb 2016 (UAE)

Tagline: Are you now or have you ever been...

English Name: Trumbo

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Did you know? Jay Roach claimed that many of the scenes featuring Trumbo writing alone at his desk or in the bathtub were improvised by Bryan Cranston while the cameras rolled, and that Cranston was genuinely composing complete sentences on the page. Read More
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as Dalton Trumbo
as Cleo Trumbo
as Hedda Hopper
as Virgil Brooks
as Ian McLellan Hunter
as Movie Theatre patron
as Juror
as Princess Ann
as Mitzi Trumbo
as D.C. Reporter
as Prisoner
as Blacklist Member
as Waiter
as Waiter
as Poolside bartender
as Himself
as Otto Preminger
as Trumbo Neighbor
as Roy Brewer
as Reporter
as Enlisted Man
as Himself
as John Wayne
as Rocco
as News Reporter
as Kirk Douglas
as Herself
as Journalist
as Prison Guard
as Congressman
as Busboy
as Nikola Trumbo
as Theatre Goer / Protester
as Private Eye / Banquet Guest
as Backyard Reporter
as Andrew Hird
as Joe Bradley
as Master of Ceremonies
as Albert Maltz
as Prisoner
as Himself
Supporting Actor
as Starlet
as J. Parnell Thomas
as Young Father
as Varinia
as Starlet / Premiere Attendee
as Writers Guild Member
as Himself
as News Reel Voice Overs
as TV Interviewer
as Legionaire / Banquet Attendee
as Himself
as Sam Wood
as Frank King
as Chris Trumbo
as Jury Foreman
as Robert Stripling
as DC Courtroom Bailiff
as Rally Participant
as News Anchor
as Ross's Girlfriend
as Ethel
as Party Goer
as Make-up Artist
as Herself
as Crassus
as Arlen Hird
as Young studio executive
as Actor
as Niki Trumbo
as Ed Muhl
as Alvah Bessie
as Chris Trumbo
as Mitzi Trumbo
as Prisoner
as Premiere Attendee / Reporter / Banquet Attendee
as Edward G. Robinson
as Roman Senator
as Chris Trumbo
as Prison Guard
as Party guest
as Waiter
as Concession Stand Lady
as Robert Kenny
as Assistant chief investigator
as Trumbo Friend
as Studio Executive
as Himself
as Louis B. Mayer
as President John F. Kennedy
as Reporter
as Adrian Scott
as Party Guest
as Himself
as Buddy Ross
as Limo Driver
as Himself
as Jeff Krandall
as Hymie King
as Maitre D
as Vivacious Receptionist
as Chris Trumbo
as Congressman
as Showgirl
as Warden
as Draba
as Showgirl


First Assistant Director
Second Assistant Director


Screenplay Writer
Dialogue Writer
Script Supervisor

Camera and Electrical

Director of Photography
Still Photographer
Key Grip
Lighting Technician


Music Director
Music Label
Music Coordinator
Music Editor


Foley Artist
Sound Re-recording Mixer
Boom Operator


Casting Director
Casting Associate
Casting Assistant
Voice Casting
Extras Casting

Costume and Wardrobe

Costume Designer
Costume Supervisor
Assistant Costume Designer


First Assistant Editor
Assistant Editor


Location Manager
Location Scout

Makeup and Hair

Special Effects Makeup Artist
Assistant Hair Stylist

Post Production

Post Production Supervisor

Special Effects

Special Effects Coordinator
Special Effects Technician


Stunt Director
Stunt Coordinator

Visual Effects

Visual Effects Studio
Digital Compositor
Film Type:
Feature Film
Colour Info:
Sound Mix:
Dolby Digital
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 (Flat), 2.35 : 1
Archival Source:
QubeVault (Real Image Media Technologies) [Digital]
Are you now or have you ever been...
When they tried to silence him, he made the world listen.
When the Oscar is presented for Best Screenplay at the 1954 Awards the presenter says, "And the Oscar goes to..." This phrase was not used by presenters until the 1990s. In the '50s the presenter would have said, "And the winner is..." when presenting an Oscar.

When Trumbo and others leave the courtroom following their conviction for Contempt of Congress in the late 1940s, they're surrounded by reporters, many of whom are using microphones not introduced until the 1970s.

Three prong outlets throughout Trumbo home are modern and were not in household use at the time.

Character Error
In the middle of the movie, Hedda Hopper (Helen Mirren) is asked how her son is doing in the Navy. She replies that he is a First Lieutenant. The Navy has no such rank; the equivalent to an Army 1LT in the Navy would be a Lieutenant (junior grade), but the Navy also has a Lieutenant rank.

Dean O'Gorman (playing Kirk Douglas) had Douglas' signature cleft chin in his subsequent scenes but in his first scene with Trumbo, he didn't have a cleft.

Hedda Hopper refers to her son, in the Navy, as a "1st Lieutenant." The Navy has no such rank. Although there may be a position of 1st Lieutenant on board ship, it's not likely that's what the writers were referring to.

Revealing Mistakes
When Trumbo is giving the final speech, the net holding the fake sideburns ant the hair at the sides of the forehead is very visible.
Edward G. Robinson did, in fact, name names in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee - including his friends like Dalton Trumbo. However, one character mentioned in the movie, Arlen Hird - played by Louis C.K. never actually existed. He is, in fact, an amalgam of several historical blacklisted writers.

Jay Roach claimed that many of the scenes featuring Trumbo writing alone at his desk or in the bathtub were improvised by Bryan Cranston while the cameras rolled, and that Cranston was genuinely composing complete sentences on the page.

Steve Martin has written that very early in his career his girlfriend and her "different" family introduced him to new ideas and intellectual opportunities. Her father was Dalton Trumbo. Martin had never heard of Dalton Trumbo.

Alan Tudyk entertained his on-screen son, Elijah Miskowski, and the other kids on set by performing the voices of King Candy (Wreck-It Ralph (2012)), Duke (Frozen (2013)), and Alister Krei (Big Hero 6 (2014)). The boys were impressed to discover he was also the marine voice from Halo 3 (2007) and it made Alan the "kid magnet" during the early shooting of Trumbo.

Gary Oldman was considered for the role of Dalton Trumbo.

This is the third feature film in four years in which John Goodman played the owner or an important employee of a movie company, following The Artist (2011) and Argo (2012). Interestingly, both prior films won Oscars for Best Picture.

The real Otto Preminger was both a director and an actor. His acting credits included The Hobbit (1977). Dean O'Gorman appeared in Peter Jackson's Hobbit trilogy.

Jay Roach's first non-comedy feature film

In the Trumbo living room, an initiation certificate is hanging from Delta Tau Delta fraternity. In real life, Dalton Trumbo was a member of this fraternity at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Based on a true story.

Trumbo's membership card number in the Communist Party was 47187.

Dalton Trumbo went on to write Steven Spielberg's "Always", a film that connects the film "Trumbo" and the real life writer himself as both of these movies star John Goodman, and "Always" also stars Audrey Hepburn who won the Best Actress Oscar for "Roman Holiday", which is famously a screenplay Dalton Trumbo couldn't be credited for writing and for which he won an Oscar he couldn't receive while on the blacklist. A clip of "Roman Holiday" featuring Hepburn is also used in the movie "Trumbo".

Four actors starred in Ben Affleck movies, Bryan Cranston and John Goodman in Argo (2012), Diane Lane in both Hollywoodland (2006) and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016), and Elle Fanning in the upcoming Live by Night (2016).
Filming Start Date:
15 Sep 2014
Filming End Date:
06 Nov 2014