The Two Faces of January (TBA)

 ●  English ● Running Time: TBA

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After he kills a detective, a con artist and his wife must trust a potentially dangerous stranger to help them get out of Greece.
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Did you know? The month of January is named after Janus, the Roman god of transitions, beginnings, gates, doors, doorways, passages and endings, and as such is usually portrayed with two faces, one looking to the future and the other to the past. Read More
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as Colette
as Rydal
as Stall Keeper
as Lauren
as Paul Vittorio
as School Teacher
as Airline Agent
as Policeman in Chania
as Heralkion Hotel Receptionist
as Elderly Woman at Hotel Grand
as Customs Hall Policeman
as Cafe Owner
as FBI Agent
as Customs Hall Policeman
as Carpet Dealer
as Turkish Plainclothes Policeman
as Turkish Plainclothes Policeman
as Father on Bus
as Boat Steward
as Local Man
as Dark Haired Young Man
as Turkish Plainclothes Policeman
as Nikos
as Hotel Grand Receptionist
as Landlady
as American Hotel Guest
as Elderly Man at Hotel Grand
as Young Greek Musician
as Customs Hall Policeman
as Barmaid (as Stela Fyrogeni)
as Chester
as Daughter on Bus

Direction

Director
First Assistant Director
Second Assistant Director

Production

Co-Producer
Line Producer
Production Supervisor
Production Manager

Writers

Screenplay Writer

Camera and Electrical

Director of Photography
Still Photographer
Camera Operator
Camera Assistant
Lighting Technician
Gaffer

Music

Music Director
Music Editor

Sound

Foley Editor
Sound Re-recording Mixer

Costume and Wardrobe

Costume Designer
Costume Supervisor
Assistant Costume Designer
Costume Assistant

Editorial

Associate Editor

Location

Location Manager

Makeup and Hair

Hair Stylist

Post Production

Post Production Supervisor

Stunts

Stunt Coordinator
Stunt Performer

Visual Effects

Visual Effects Producer
Visual Effects Supervisor
Visual Effects Coordinator
Visual Effects Artist
Compositor
Film Type:
Feature Film
Language:
English
Colour Info:
Color
Sound Mix:
Dolby Digital
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1
Stereoscopy:
No
Goofs:
Revealing Mistakes
Before entering the ruins, it is supposedly dark, and rainy. The shadows on the ground however tell another story. The sharp shadows suggests the scene is in broad daylight, and is just darkened to suggest the sudden thunderstorm.

Factual Mistake
In the beginning Rydal recounts the legend of Aegeus on the steps of the Acropolis and says that it was there that Aegeus jumped to his death after his son, Theseus returned from Crete and forgot to change the black sails to white to denote his success. This is untrue; you would not be able to see the Aegean from the Acropolis, anyway. According to the legend Aegeus was waiting for the ships to arrive at Cape Sounion and when he saw the black sails he plunged into the sea (which is called the Aegean Sea after him). It is unlikely that a tour guide would not know how to recount the legend properly.
Trivia:
Principal photography began August 2012 in Athens, Crete, Istanbul, and London's Ealing Studios. Identifiable locations include the Küçük Hasan mosque on Chania harbour, a nearby café and the Grand Arsenal in Plateia Katehaki, the ruins of Knossos near Iraklion, and the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul

The month of January is named after Janus, the Roman god of transitions, beginnings, gates, doors, doorways, passages and endings, and as such is usually portrayed with two faces, one looking to the future and the other to the past.