The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2014)

 ●  English ● 1 hr 55 mins

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In this adaptation of James Thurber's classic story, a day-dreamer escapes his anonymous life by disappearing into a world of fantasies filled with heroism, romance and action. When his and his co-worker's jobs are threatened, Walter takes action in the real world by embarking on a global journey that turns into an adventure more extraordinary than anything he could have ever imagined.
Movie Rating
Based on 2 ratings
Music Rating
Based on 1 rating
Did you know? In May 1999 New Line hired Mask director Chuck Russell to rewrite the script and serve as Howard's replacement. Filming was set to begin in early-2000, but was pushed back. Around this time, Peter Tolan worked on rewrites. In May 2001 Goldwyn filed a lawsuit against New Line over breach of contract purposes. Goldwyn claimed that the studio extended their 1995 deal until May 2001, but then announced that it wanted to transfer the rights for the remake to another company and have Goldwyn surrender his creative input. In November 2002 New Line was forced to revert the film rights back to Goldwyn, who won his lawsuit and took the property to Paramount Pictures. During pre-production discussions between Paramount and DreamWorks Pictures on Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (which starred Carrey), Steven Spielberg, head of DreamWorks, rekindled interest in working with Carrey; the duo previously considered Meet the Parents, but the outing fell apart. In May 2003 Spielberg agreed to direct, and brought in DreamWorks to co-finance The Secret Life of Walter Mitty with Paramount (who would acquire DreamWorks in 2006). Read More
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Actor
as Walter Mitty
as Cheryl
as NYC Pedestrian
as Hernando
as Aerial coordinator
as Chris
as Time Life Employee
as Female Reporter
as Pedestrian
as Business Woman
as Boy in Park
as TSA Agent
as Businessman's Daughter
as Businessman's Daughter
as Time Life Employee
as International Traveler
as International Traveler
as Airline Ticket Agent
Supporting Actress
as Walter's Dad
as Life Magazine Employee
as Time Life Employee
as Time Life Employee
as Cab Driver
as Time Life Employee
as Business Woman
as Time Life Editor
as Business Woman
Supporting Actor
as Tim Naughton
as Mover #2
as School Girl
Supporting Actress
as Airline Passenger
as Dream Sequence Businessman
as TSA Agent
as Time Life Employee
as Time Life Employee
as Rich Melhoff
as Fisherman
as Onlooker
as Rachel
as Boom Truck Operator
Supporting Actor
Supporting Actor
as Airport Traveler at Ticket Counter
as Time Life Magazine Employee
as Cheryl's Neighbor #2
as Life Employee
as Sean O'Connell
Supporting Actress
as Stockbroker
as Business woman
as Time Life Employee
as International Tourist

Direction

Director
First Assistant Director

Distribution

Distributor

Writers

Screenplay Writer

Camera and Electrical

Director of Photography

Music

Music Director

Sound

Sound Mixer
Foley Editor

Art

Art Director
Production Designer
Set Decorator

Casting

Casting Director

Costume and Wardrobe

Costume Designer

Editorial

Editor

Makeup and Hair

Hair Stylist

Special Effects

Special Effects Coordinator
Special Effects Technician

Stunts

Stunt Coordinator
Stunt Performer

Visual Effects

Visual Effects Artist
Film Type:
Feature Film
Language:
English
Colour Info:
Color
Sound Mix:
Dolby
Camera:
ARRICAM Lite (LT)
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1
Stereoscopy:
No
Archival Source:
QubeVault (Real Image Media Technologies) [Digital]
Goofs:
Continuity
When Walter is riding the bicycle on the Iceland country road, the white line in the middle of the road changes between shots from a double line to a single broken line to a single continuous line.

Continuity
When Walter meets Odessa at Life, he is holding the cake with his right or left hand with no continuity between angles.

Continuity
When Walter teaches Rich how to use the skateboard, the pavement is on the sunny side in the close-up angles, but in the shadows in the wide angles.

Revealing Mistakes
When Walter is floating in the water, his shoulders are well out of the water because he's standing on a hidden underwater platform. In real life, he'd be up to his neck and have trouble keeping his head above water.

Continuity
In the scene where Walter is bribing the Warlords with cake, the warlord stabs the cake with his bayonet through the lemon icing wedge, but in the next shot the knife is in at a different angle when he takes a bite. Then as he he smiles at his men the knife is inserted into the cake in a completely different way, with no bite missing.

Continuity
When Walter Mitty is on the skateboard riding towards the Icelandic town, there is a shot of him riding along wearing Nike Frees, the camera then cuts to a close up of his shoes and the board, and the shoes in that shot have changed to Vans authentic.

Continuity
In the last scene when Mitty and the lady friend see the magazine cover at the news stand he is wearing hiking boots. Then when they switch to the wide angle of the two of them walking away, Mitty is wearing a type of work/military boot.

Continuity
The skateboard on Richard's video (sent to Walter via mail) is different than the one Walter gave him from Iceland.
Trivia:
Actors Jim Carrey, Owen Wilson, Mike Myers and Sacha Baron Cohen were all considered for the role of Mitty during the development of this film.

Filmmakers Steven Spielberg, Ron Howard and Mark Waters have all considered remaking this project.

Will Ferrell was considered for the role of Walter Mitty.

The music in the film's first trailer was set to the song called "Dirty Paws" performed by the Icelandic band Of Monsters and Men.

Producer Samuel Goldwyn Jr., whose father, the famed Samuel Goldwyn, produced The Secret Life of Walter Mitty with Danny Kaye in 1947, conceived the idea of doing a remake in 1994 with Jim Carrey in mind for the title role. Walt Disney Pictures was enthusiastic to purchase the remake rights, but Goldwyn instead chose New Line Cinema, who held a positive working relationship with Carrey on Dumb & Dumber and The Mask. The studio bought the rights in 1995 with the understanding that The Samuel Goldwyn Company would be involved in creative decisions. Babaloo Mandel and Lowell Ganz (writers of Parenthood and A League of Their Own) turned in the first draft of the screenplay in July 1997. Ron Howard entered negotiations to direct that same month, as well as cover producing duties with Brian Grazer and Imagine Entertainment. Howard, Grazer, and Imagine Entertainment eventually left the project in favor of Edtv, and The Secret Life of Walter Mitty languished in development hell over the challenges of using a contemporary storyline.

In May 1999 New Line hired Mask director Chuck Russell to rewrite the script and serve as Howard's replacement. Filming was set to begin in early-2000, but was pushed back. Around this time, Peter Tolan worked on rewrites. In May 2001 Goldwyn filed a lawsuit against New Line over breach of contract purposes. Goldwyn claimed that the studio extended their 1995 deal until May 2001, but then announced that it wanted to transfer the rights for the remake to another company and have Goldwyn surrender his creative input. In November 2002 New Line was forced to revert the film rights back to Goldwyn, who won his lawsuit and took the property to Paramount Pictures. During pre-production discussions between Paramount and DreamWorks Pictures on Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (which starred Carrey), Steven Spielberg, head of DreamWorks, rekindled interest in working with Carrey; the duo previously considered Meet the Parents, but the outing fell apart. In May 2003 Spielberg agreed to direct, and brought in DreamWorks to co-finance The Secret Life of Walter Mitty with Paramount (who would acquire DreamWorks in 2006).

In April 2010, Sacha Baron Cohen was offered and attached to star in the lead role. Later that month, The Pursuit of Happyness writer 'Steven Conrad (I)' was hired to pen the screenplay, with Gore Verbinski announced as director in June 2010. In April 2011, it was announced that Ben Stiller had landed the lead role, and in July 2011, it was announced that he was also due to direct the film, due to Verbinski's involvement with The Lone Ranger.

Despite not having a final budget, Paramount scheduled a December 12, 2005 start date because their option on the remake rights was to end one week later; they would lose the rights if they did not start filming before December 20. However, Wilson dropped out in October 2005 over creative differences. The Hollywood Reporter also speculated that Walter Mitty began to falter after Paramount failed to cast a female lead to star opposite Wilson. Scarlett Johansson had reportedly emerged as the front-runner after screen testing with Wilson earlier in October, but a deal was never signed with the actress. Paramount executives 'Brad Grey (I)' and Gail Berman decided to put Walter Mitty in turnaround in November 2005. Goldwyn found favor at Twentieth Century Fox and, in May 2007, it was announced that Mike Myers was attached to star in the title role. Jay Kogen was hired to write a new script that would be specifically tailored for Myers.