The Fifth Estate (2013)

 ●  English ● 2 hrs 8 mins

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Triggering our age of high-stakes secrecy, explosive news leaks and the trafficking of classified information, WikiLeaks forever changed the game. Now, in a dramatic thriller based on real events, 'The Fifth Estate' reveals the quest to expose the deceptions and corruptions of power that turned an Internet upstart into the 21st century’s most fiercely debated organization. The story begins as WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (Benedict Cumberbatch) and his colleague Daniel Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Brühl) team up to become underground watchdogs of the privileged and powerful. On a shoestring, they create a platform that allows whistle-blowers to anonymously leak covert data, shining a light on the dark recesses of government secrets and corporate crimes. Soon, they are breaking more hard news than the world’s most legendary media organizations combined. But when Assange and Berg gain access to the biggest trove of confidential intelligence documents in U.S. history, they battle each other and a defining question of our time: what are the costs of keeping secrets in a free society, and what are the costs of exposing them?"

Cast: Benedict Cumberbatch, Carice Van Houten, Daniel Brühl

Crew: Bill Condon (Director), Tobias A Schliessler (Director of Photography), Carter Burwell (Music Director)

Rating: A (India)

Genres: Drama, History, Thriller

Release Dates: 25 Oct 2013 (India)

Tagline: You can't expose the world's secrets without exposing yourself.

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Did you know? James McAvoy was cast as Daniel Domscheit-Berg but he dropped out due to a schedule conflict with his stage play, Macbeth. Daniel Brühl replaced him. Read More
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as Julian Assange
as Birgitta Jónsdóttir
as Daniel Berg
as Marcel Rosenbach
as Dr Tarek Haliseh
as Anke Domscheit
as Mutassim Al-Gaddafi
as General
as Holger Stark
as Sam Coulson
as Young Julian
as New York Times Reporter
as Guardian Lawyer
as Times Reporter
as The airplane passenger
as Ian Katz
as Nick Davies
as WikiLeaks Staffer #1
as Wikileaks Staffer #2
as Ziggy
as Wired Reporter
as White House Staffer
as Sarah Shaw
as Supervisor
as Alex Lang
as Ralph Zilke
as Irritated Reporter
as Otto
as Shida Haliseh
as Marcus
as Border Guard
as Bar's woman
as Alan Rusbridger
as Floormanager
as James Boswell
as Broadcast Journalist

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Director of Photography

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Film Type:
Feature Film
Language:
English
Colour Info:
Color
Sound Mix:
Datasat Digital Sound, Dolby Digital, Sony Dynamic Digital Sound
Camera:
ARRI ALEXA Plus
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1
Stereoscopy:
No
Archival Source:
QubeVault (Real Image Media Technologies) [Digital]
Taglines:
You can't expose the world's secrets without exposing yourself.
Trivia:
The character 'Ziggy' is based on the WikiLeaks volunteer Sigurdur Thordarson that later turned out to be an FBI Informant.

Julian Assange emailed Benedict Cumberbatch asking him not to participate in the film.

James McAvoy was cast as Daniel Domscheit-Berg but he dropped out due to a schedule conflict with his stage play, Macbeth. Daniel Brühl replaced him.

On July 2012 it was reported that Jeremy Renner was very keen on playing Julian Assange. However, it was announced on October the same year that Benedict Cumberbatch has landed the lead.

Joel Kinnaman auditioned for the role of Daniel Domscheit-Berg.

On September 18 2013, Wikileaks released a mature version of the complete script to the public, due to the following reason stated "The film is, from WikiLeaks' perspective, irresponsible, counterproductive and harmful.' They also published a 'Talking Points' memo "because it represents a frank internal appraisal of [the film] and what is wrong with it."