Prometheus -3-D (2012)

 ●  English ● 2 hrs 4 mins

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This film is set in 2093 and takes place in the same universe as the 'Alien' movies. A group of explorers, including some archaeologists, are on an "undisclosed" mission. They arrive at a planet millions of miles away from Earth. The team spot what they believe to be signs of civilization. They go to investigate and find more than just signs, they find conclusive evidence. But some of them have an ulterior motive for being there, including the Weyland Corporation. They believe that this is where the human race actually came from. Things soon turn from excitement to survival once inside their discovery.
See Storyline (May Contain Spoilers)

Cast: Logan Marshall Green, Michael Fassbender, Noomi Rapace

Crew: Ridley Scott (Director), Dariusz Wolski (Director of Photography), Marc Streitenfeld (Music Director)

Rating: A (India)

Genres: Adventure, Mystery, Sci-Fi

Release Dates: 08 Jun 2012 (India)

Tagline: The search for our beginning could lead to our end

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Did you know? Ridley Scott decided against featuring Xenomorphs (the titular Alien of the film series) in the film, as "the sequels squeezed him dry, he did very well... and no way am I going back there." Instead, this being an indirect prequel to Alien (1979), he decided to feature a Xenomorph ancestor/parent. Read More
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Camera and Electrical

Director of Photography


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Casting Director

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Makeup Artist
Film Type:
Feature Film
Colour Info:
Sound Mix:
Datasat Digital Sound, Dolby Digital, Dolby Surround 7.1
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1
Shot in 3D
The search for our beginning could lead to our end
They went looking for our beginning. What they found could be our end.
We came from them. They will come for us.
Revealing Mistakes
All EKG monitors of the expedition party's HUD shows the same heartbeat pattern and rate regardless of individual or stress.

Revealing Mistakes
Just before Dr Holloway points out the area to land, he unstraps himself from his chair. While leaving the chair he bumps it and you can clearly see the chair is loose on the floor.

Revealing Mistakes
(at around 54 mins) One of the geologists is examining the pile of bodies and it's clearly visible that one of the "alien" hands (in the right part of the screen) wiggles, as if made of rubber.

Character Error
When Charlie is describing the civilizations that provided the clues and star maps leading them to the distant moon, he explains that these civilizations were all separated by centuries and had no contact. In this list he includes Sumerians, Babylonians, and Egyptians (among others). The Babylonian Empire rose out of the city-states of the Sumerians, borrowing heavily from their language, culture, and religions. It is also well known that the people of Sumer/Babylon had much contact with the ancient Egyptians via trade and war.

Character Error
Dr Shaw returns to the escape pod with only 30 seconds of oxygen remaining in her suit. She takes off her helmet, encounters the alien, and leaves the escape pod without recharging the oxygen in the suit.

The tattoo above Fifield's left eye disappears randomly.

When Meredith Vickers finishes her push-ups, just after 'waking up', she is wearing cloth around her chest. After the shot where she puts on her bathrobe, she wears no cloth under the robe.

Factual Mistake
A CO2 concentration of 3% in the atmosphere is still not a lethal amount for human beings. Only after 7% does suffocation and unconsciousness begin.

Factual Mistake
Ellie dates the alien corpse that they find. While it can be safely assumed that the radioactive decay of carbon would be the same everywhere, carbon dating requires a knowledge of what the original ratio of carbon 14 to carbon 12 was at the time of death. On Earth, that is not constant and must be calibrated with biological samples from known ages in a very complicated process. Having just arrived on the planet, while they could measure the current ratios of carbon in the atmosphere, they do not know how constant that ratio is and have not had a chance to get the vast amounts of data to calibrate it. They don't even know if the alien was from that planet or had just arrived when they found it. A scientist would know this and would not make unwarranted assumptions about the age of the sample.

Factual Mistake
In the first shot of Prometheus, it is moving at high speed. When it enters the target planet/moon's atmosphere, it must slow down which should mean that the thrusters would be pointing forwards and down, not straight backwards as seen.

Factual Mistake
When Janek orders the pilot to prepare the ion drive, he interrupts the pilot's response. The pilot was probably about to tell him that, much like a propeller built for air being used underwater, an ion drive built for deep space wouldn't work at all in an atmosphere.
During production, Ridley Scott kept the use of computer-generated imagery as low as possible, using CGI mainly in space scenes; Scott recalled advice VFXpert Douglas Trumbull gave him on the set of Blade Runner (1982): "If you can do it live, do it live", and also claimed that practical VFX was more cost-effective than digital VFX.

The androids' names in the Alien films follow an alphabetical pattern: in Alien (1979) it's Ash, in Aliens (1986) and Alien³ (1992) it's Bishop, in Alien: Resurrection (1997) it's Call and in this film it's David.

Ridley Scott decided against featuring Xenomorphs (the titular Alien of the film series) in the film, as "the sequels squeezed him dry, he did very well... and no way am I going back there." Instead, this being an indirect prequel to Alien (1979), he decided to feature a Xenomorph ancestor/parent.

Director Ridley Scott named the film "Prometheus", seeing the name aptly fit the film's themes: "It's the story of creation; the gods and the man who stood against them." In Greek mythology, the Titan Prometheus was a servant of the gods, who stole and gave to mankind the gift of fire, an immeasurable benefit that changed the human race forever (for better AND worse).

Designer H.R. Giger, who worked on the original design of the Xenomorph Alien (1979), was brought in to assist in reverse-engineering the design of the Aliens in the film.

To prepare for his role as the android David, Michael Fassbender watched Blade Runner (1982) (a Ridley Scott film), The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976), The Servant (1963) and Lawrence of Arabia (1962) (mentioned by Peter Weyland). Fassbender also studied Olympic diver Greg Louganis, drawing inspiration from Louganis's physicality.

Composer Marc Streitenfeld had the orchestra play his compositions backwards, and then digitally reversed the compositions for the final film. This made the music sound unusual and unsettling, which he felt was right for the film.

The "beginning of time" sequence that opens the film was shot in Iceland. The whole shoot took two weeks to complete.

Ridley Scott suggested that an Engineer was sent to Earth to stop humanity's increasing aggression, but was crucified; the implication being that it was Jesus Christ. He felt though that this would be too obvious a religious allegory for the film.

In one of the screenplay drafts for Alien (1979), there was a sex scene between Ripley and Dallas, to show how crew members would engage in casual sex during long space travels, simply to fulfill their needs. Ridley Scott never filmed the scene, but the idea was reused for this film in the exchange between Vickers and Janek.

Charlize Theron found herself struggling during her action scenes due to her smoking habit, particularly the segments that required her to run through sand in boots weighing 30 pounds (14 kg).

Charlize Theron was originally cast as Elizabeth Shaw, but had to decline the role due to scheduling conflicts. Later, another change in schedule freed Theron to do the film, thus allowing her to take the role of Meredith Vickers, as Noomi Rapace had already taken the role of Shaw.

Ridley Scott instructed Charlize Theron to stand in corners and move in lurking movements, in order to accentuate Vickers's distant, enigmatic nature.

During the scene in which the Hammerpede erupts from Millburn's corpse, Ridley Scott did not inform Kate Dickie about what was to occur in the scene and thus her screaming reaction was real.

According to Ridley Scott, the film's plot was inspired by Erich von Däniken's writings about ancient astronauts: "Both NASA and the Vatican agree that it is almost mathematically impossible that we can be where we are today, without there being a little help along the way. That's what we're looking at: we are talking about gods and engineers, engineers of space. Were the Aliens designed as a form of biological warfare, or biology that would go in and clean up a planet?"

While Ridley Scott suggested that the cast could have slept and effectively "lived" on the Prometheus interior set during initial filming, this didn't happen due to health and safety precautions.

The Swedish actress Noomi Rapace, who plays British character Shaw, worked on set with a dialect coach to help her achieve the closest accent she could manage.

Ridley Scott stated that he was filming "the most aggressive film [he] could" by not caring about MPAA ratings, having support for such bold movement from 20th Century Fox CEO Tom Rothman, who addressed Alien (1979) fans by saying that he was "very aware of their concern", and that "they can take it that the film will not be compromised either way. So if that means that the film is R, then it'll be an R. If it's PG-13, then it'll be a PG-13, but it will not be compromised." Scott shot the film with both adult-only R and more accessible PG-13 film ratings in mind, allowing the more adult content to be cut if necessary without harming the overall presentation, given the case it was asked to be cut down. Eventually, the film was rated "R for Sci-Fi violence including some intense images, and brief language", and it was released without any demanded cuts.

In 2002, Aliens (1986) director James Cameron discussed ideas for a fifth Alien (1979) film with Ridley Scott, with the intention that Cameron would produce the film with Scott directing, and Sigourney Weaver returning to star in the lead role of Ripley. However upon discovering that 20th Century Fox were developing the crossover film AVP: Alien vs. Predator (2004), Cameron ceased all work on the project, believing that the crossover would "kill the validity of the franchise". Though Cameron went on to state that he would never again work with the Alien franchise, Scott eventually ended up reworking their idea into this film.

When Prometheus approaches the landing zone, straight marks on the ground can be seen which are very similar to the Nazca lines located in the Nazca Desert in southern Peru. The Nazca lines are considered by few rogue scientists/archaeologists to be runways of an ancient airfield used by extraterrestrials. This idea was popularized by Swiss author, Erich von Däniken, and is generally regarded as pseudo-science. One of the more prevailing and accepted theories posits that the lines were part of the religious practices of the local people. Other theories place astronomical, cosmological or topographical significance to them.
Movie Connection(s):
Features: Lawrence of Arabia (English)
References: Aliens (English)
References: Alien (English)
References: 2001: A Space Odyssey (English)
References: Lawrence of Arabia (English)
Spin off from: Alien (English)
Followed by: Prometheus 2 (English)
Follows: Alien 3 (English)
Follows: Aliens (English)
Follows: Alien (English)