Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998)

 ●  English ● 1 hr 47 mins

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A botched card game in London triggers four friends, thugs, weed-growers, hard gangsters, loan sharks and debt collectors to collide with each other in a series of unexpected events, all for the sake of weed, cash and two antique shotguns. Eddy has been known as a cardsharp since he was young. So he and his three friends Soap, Tom and Bacon all decide to chip in £25,000 each to allow him to play in an illegal high-roller game run by one of the local villains, Hatchet Harry. However, Eddy didn't realize the game was crooked and he ends up owing Harry £500,000 with dire threats about losing his fingers one at a time if he doesn't pay within a week! Eddy and his friends discuss various completely illegal schemes to obtain the money and eventually decide to rip-off the gang of thieves next door who themselves are planning to raid a clandestine drug growing operation which keeps all of its money in shoe boxes where they grow the cannabis plants. The scheme is simple enough but the best laid plans of mice and men always seems to go awry as does this one. As extreme chaos breaks loose the violence and associated body count spiral out of control, Eddy and his friends realize that they are out of their depth and desperately try to find a way out before they too find themselves among the casualties!
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Did you know? The scene where Nick the Greek breaks the glass in the coffee table was not in the original script. It was, in fact, an accident that happened during filming and was written in by Guy Ritchie as an afterthought. Read More
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as Tom
as Alan / Narrator
as Slick
as Man In Pub
as Gordon
as Willie
as Barfly Jack
as Samoan Jo
as Policeman
as Soap
as Dog
as Policeman
as Paul
as Dean
as John O'Driscoll
as Bacon
as Don
as Doorman
as Barry The Baptist
as Serg
as Yuppy In Car
as Charles
as Eddy
as Hatchet Harry
as Little Chris
as Frazer
as Traffic Warden
as Mickey
as Phil (as Sydney Golder)
as Nick The Greek
as Boxing Gym Bouncer
as Plank
as Winston
as JD
as Gloria
as Drowning Man
as John
as Rory Breaker
as Tanya
as Gary
as Big Chris

Direction

Director
First Assistant Director

Production

Producer
Co-Producer
Line Producer
Associate Producer
Production Manager

Distribution

Writers

Dialogue Writer

Camera and Electrical

Director of Photography
Still Photographer
Camera Operator

Music

Music Director

Sound

Sound Re-recording Mixer
Foley Artist

Art

Assistant Art Director

Casting

Casting Assistant

Costume and Wardrobe

Costume Designer

Editorial

Assistant Editor

Makeup and Hair

Makeup Artist
Hair Stylist

Stunts

Stunt Coordinator
Film Type:
Feature Film
Language:
English
Colour Info:
Color
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1
Stereoscopy:
No
Taglines:
A Disgrace to Criminals Everywhere.
They lost half a million at cards but they've still got a few tricks up their sleeve
Goofs:
Revealing Mistakes
As Tanya, the dealer, is explaining the game of Three Card Brag she completes the initial deal. She accidentally exposes the bottom of the deck which would be visible by all players as a 7 of diamonds. This should have resulted in a misdeal.

Continuity
During the closing sequences of the film where Tom is seen wearing a woolen hat, his long hair is visible at the back in many shots. This is despite his character having short cropped hair throughout the rest of the film.

Audio/Video Mismatch
In the director's cut, when Kenny and Gary have stolen the guns and the old man shoots a hole in Gary's hair, Dean says, "are you all right, Gary?" You then see his lips ask "Gary?" again, but you only hear him say it in the next shot of the smoking hair. The original region 1 version has the sound in sync with the lip movement.

Character Error
When Dog describes Golf as a "way to spoil a good walk" he attributes the quote to Winston Churchill. The quote "Golf is a good walk spoiled." is generally attributed to mark Twain although it first appeared in 1903 in a book by H S Scrivener.
Trivia:
The scene where Nick the Greek breaks the glass in the coffee table was not in the original script. It was, in fact, an accident that happened during filming and was written in by Guy Ritchie as an afterthought.
Movie Connection(s):
References: King Kong (English)