Gravity (2013)

 ●  English ● 1 hr 31 mins

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Dr Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock) is a brilliant medical engineer on her first shuttle mission, with veteran astronaut Matt Kowalsky (George Clooney). But on a seemingly routine spacewalk, disaster strikes. The shuttle is destroyed, leaving Stone and Kowalsky completely alone, tethered to nothing but each other and spiraling out into the blackness. The deafening silence tells them they have lost any link to Earth and any chance for rescue. As fear turns to panic, every gulp of air eats away at what little oxygen is left. But the only way home may be to go further out into the terrifying expanse of space.

Cast: George Clooney, Sandra Bullock

Crew: Alfonso Cuaron (Director), Emmanuel Lubezki (Director of Photography), Steven Price (Music Director)

Rating: U/A (India)

Genres: Drama, Sci-Fi, Thriller

Release Dates: 04 Oct 2013 (India)

Tagline: Don't Let Go

Movie Rating
Based on 11 ratings
Music Rating
Based on 6 ratings
Did you know? Robert Downey Jr was the original choice for the male lead. However, when the technology of the movie was clearly identified, the creators of the movie felt that it would be a big obstacle for his performance. He is undoubtedly an immensely talented actor, and is fantastic when given the freedom to completely breathe and improvise and change stuff, but his style was not compatible with the technologies used in the movie. In the end, the choice of George Clooney was perfect because he could exude charm, add A-list cachet, and stick to a script. Read More
One of the best movies I've seen.
on

0
as Matt Kowalsky
as Dr. Ryan Stone
as Explorer Captain
as Space Station Captain
as Mission Control
as NASA
Supporting Actor
as Shariff

Direction

Director
First Assistant Director
Second Assistant Director

Distribution

Distributor

Writers

Screenplay Writer

Camera and Electrical

Director of Photography

Music

Music Director

Art

Production Designer
Art Director
Set Decorator

Casting

Casting Director

Costume and Wardrobe

Costume Designer

Editorial

Makeup and Hair

Makeup Artist
Hair Stylist

Post Production

Post Production Supervisor
Film Type:
Feature Film
Language:
English
Colour Info:
Color
Sound Mix:
Datasat Digital Sound, Dolby Digital
Camera:
ARRI ALEXA M
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
1.89 : 1 (IMAX), 2.35 : 1
Stereoscopy:
Shot in 3D
Archival Source:
QubeVault (Real Image Media Technologies) [Digital]
Taglines:
Don't Let Go
Goofs:
Factual Mistake
In the scene when Sandra Bullock is about to turn off the oxygen, a couple of tears leave her eyes and float up. They would actually form in a small puddle on her eye.

Factual Mistake
When the Chinese space station is de-orbiting, and the atmosphere is stripping parts off the outside, Dr Ryan Stone is inside with objects floating about her. In reality, there would be a small deceleration caused by the atmospheric drag that would pull all objects to the front of the craft.

Factual Mistake
The shuttle's original mission was to service Hubble, yet when the shuttle is wrecked, Kowalsky moves with Stone to the ISS, which just happens to be "a short hike away." Hubble orbits at an altitude of 350 miles/560km, while the ISS does so at an altitude of about 250 miles/410km. Furthermore, even if they had been able to see the ISS from Hubble's orbit, they would have only seen it speed ahead, as their orbital velocities are very different: 7.66km per second for the ISS and 7.5km per second for Hubble.

Miscellaneous
In several scenes, Sandra Bullock used radio equipment in efforts to call for assistance. There is a sound made by vintage, mechanically tuned radios called "heterodyning" that results in a squealing, variable frequency sound in the speaker. While heterodyning added a degree of drama to the scenes in "Gravity", contemporary digital radios operate on a different, highly stable technique for tuning, and do not produce heterodyne sounds.

Factual Mistake
During the first few minutes, before all the comsats get taken out by the debris storm, conversation between Houston and the Space Shuttle include Quindar tones. Quindar tones are the sharp beeps attending each voice transmission. These tones are obsolete and haven't been used for many years.

Factual Mistake
Space debris from an exploded satellite orbiting the earth catches up with Ryan every 90 minutes (as she goes from the Explorer to the ISS to the Chinese space station, all roughly at the same altitude). This is physically impossible. To do this, the debris would have to be traveling fast enough to catch up with the orbiting space stations every 90 minutes. However, objects orbiting at different speeds must travel at different altitudes. The faster the orbit, the lower the altitude. So it would be impossible for the debris to "catch up" with the space stations three times. Even if the two were moving in opposite directions, they would collide once every 45 minutes, as the ISS' orbit period is 90 minutes.

Factual Mistake
When Stone makes it to the Chinese station, it is experiencing reentry. This is nothing but a drama-making mistake, as the station would have needed to have been actively boosted down/slowed down for it to have been a deliberate deorbit, or have had its navigation completely neglected for months or years for its orbit to decay to that point. In either of these two cases, it could not have been orbiting at a fixed position with the otherwise-stable ISS.

Factual Mistake
When Sandra reaches the Soyuz space capsule she turns the oxygen 'on' by turning the red knobs counter-clockwise. When she turns the oxygen off she turned the knobs clockwise. But when she turns the oxygen back on she turns the knobs clockwise again.

Factual Mistake
After the rope keeping Ryan and Matt tethered together is snapped, Ryan continues drifting downwards towards the Earth. The shot continues panning until the camera stops with the camera high up. As she falls, the ropes from the parachute around the satellite are visibly on Ryan's right. In the next shot from low down, the ropes from the parachute have moved to Ryan's left.

Factual Mistake
When Ryan mentions her daughter, and Matt turns off his music, he hold up his right arm and looks in the mirror, but the shot of the mirror itself is on his left hand.

Factual Mistake
No critical communications satellites orbit at 400-600km above the Earth (where most of the film takes place). They are either at 200km or about 35000km. This means that the field could not have knocked out the communications with Houston.

Factual Mistake
When the Chinese space station is de-orbiting, and the atmosphere is stripping parts off the outside, Dr Ryan Stone is inside with objects floating about her. In reality, there would be a small deceleration caused by the atmospheric drag that would pull all objects to the front of the craft.

Factual Mistake
There are several scenes which depict space debris reaching the astronauts' location, with catastrophic results. While the impact of these collisions are probably realistic, it's highly improbable that this debris would be visible (you can spot many objects approaching, missing or hitting Sandra and George's location) mainly because of their ultra high speed relative to the astronauts' area. Remember, we are talking about orbits with speeds in the order of several 10k's of km/h.

Factual Mistake
In the scene when Sandra Bullock is about to turn off the oxygen, a couple of tears leave her eyes and float up. They would actually form in a small puddle on her eye.

Factual Mistake
The shuttle's original mission was to service Hubble, yet when the shuttle is wrecked, Kowalsky moves with Stone to the ISS, which just happens to be "a short hike away." Hubble orbits at an altitude of 350 miles/560km, while the ISS does so at an altitude of about 250 miles/410km. Furthermore, even if they had been able to see the ISS from Hubble's orbit, they would have only seen it speed ahead, as their orbital velocities are very different: 7.66km per second for the ISS and 7.5km per second for Hubble.

Factual Mistake
When Stone makes her transfer from the Soyuz emergency escape system to the Chinese Station, she takes 3+ minutes from fastening her helmet to being inside the station. Her space suit does not include an oxygen supply. Only residual air (from the Soyuz spacecraft) is available to her, and a lot of action occurs. She couldn't do it. Too long a time, too little air. The Sokol spacesuit portrayed is intended for intra vehicular operation and requires external sources of oxygen and ventilation to be functional (as depicted in scenes before).
Trivia:
Robert Downey Jr was the original choice for the male lead. However, when the technology of the movie was clearly identified, the creators of the movie felt that it would be a big obstacle for his performance. He is undoubtedly an immensely talented actor, and is fantastic when given the freedom to completely breathe and improvise and change stuff, but his style was not compatible with the technologies used in the movie. In the end, the choice of George Clooney was perfect because he could exude charm, add A-list cachet, and stick to a script.

While Angelina Jolie was the initial choice for the female lead, Sandra Bullock was chosen in her stead when Angelina chose to drop out due to scheduling conflicts.

The Blu-ray, 3D Blu-ray and DVD release of this movie was on March 3, the morning after the Academy Awards where it was up for ten Oscars. It also received 11 BAFTA nominations, providing ample proof to its critical acclaim and attractiveness and value in the real world.

Sandra Bullock spent six months in physical training to prepare for shooting while reviewing the script with Cuarón in meticulous detail.

Though the film itself is scientifically accurate in depicting no sound in space, sound effects were added to the film's trailers to make them appear more exciting.

Alfonso Cuarón, cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki, and visual effects supervisor Tim Webber decided that they couldn't make Gravity as they wanted to by simply using traditional methods. So for the spacewalk scenes, says Webber, "We decided to shoot (the actors') faces and create everything else digitally. Which was quite a difficult decision." To do that, Lubezki reasoned, he would need to light the faces to match the all-digital environment they'd be put into. Whether the characters were floating gently, changing direction or tumbling in space, the facial light would have to be a perfect match for the Earth, sun and stars in the background. "That can break easily," explains Lubezki, "if the light is not moving at the speed that it has to move, if the position of the light is not right, if the contrast or density on the faces is wrong, et cetera." Lubezki suggested folding an LED screen into a box, putting the actor inside, and using the light from the screen to light the actor. That way, instead of moving either Bullock or Clooney in the middle of static lights, the projected image could move while they stayed still and safe. This "light box" became the key to the spacewalk scenes. But it was only a nine-foot cube, just big enough for one actor, not an actor and a camera crew.

Gravity had languished in development hell for four years, because the film's ambition, in terms of the cinematography, visual effects, and realistic "story atmosphere" of outer space, proved to be too challenging and Cuarón had to wait for the technology to be far more advanced and progressed to meet his vision; that was finally realized in 2009 with James Cameron's Avatar.

A chance meeting between their siblings lead to Astronaut Cady Coleman placing a phone call from the International Space Station to Sandra Bullock to speak with her about life in space.

A chance meeting between their siblings lead to Astronaut Cady Coleman placing a phone call from the International Space Station to Sandra Bullock to speak with her about life in space.

Angelina Jolie was originally cast but dropped out later. Natalie Portman was the top choice for the lead role after Angelina Jolie refused it two times. Natalie turned down the role shortly before she announced her pregnancy. Finally, Sandra Bullock was cast.

Robert Downey Jr. was cast but dropped out due to scheduling conflicts.

Rachel Weisz, Naomi Watts, Marion Cotillard, Abbie Cornish, Carey Mulligan, Sienna Miller, Scarlett Johansson, Blake Lively, Rebecca Hall and Olivia Wilde were all subsequently tested or approached for the lead role, after approaching Angelina Jolie and Natalie Portman.
‘Gravity’ wins big at Saturn Movie Awards
29 Jun 2014, by The Indian Express
Sandra Bullock: the pain of 'Gravity'
06 Feb 2014, by The Guardian
'Gravity', Part 2: thinking inside the box
12 Nov 2013, by David Bordwell
Will 'Gravity' prompt push for 'Visual Imaging' Oscar?
26 Oct 2013, by Hollywood Reporter