Blade Runner (1982)

 ●  English ● 1 hr 56 mins

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This futuristic, sci-fi thriller depicts a dystopian Los Angeles in November 2019, in which genetically engineered organic robots called replicants, which are visually indistinguishable from adult humans, are manufactured by the powerful Tyrell Corporation as well as by other "mega-corporations" around the world. Their use on Earth is banned and replicants are exclusively used for dangerous, menial, or leisure work on off-world colonies. Replicants who defy the ban and return to Earth are hunted down and "retired" by special police operatives known as "Blade Runners". The plot focuses on a desperate group of recently escaped replicants hiding in Los Angeles and the burnt-out expert Blade Runner, Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), who reluctantly agrees to take on one more assignment to hunt them down.

Cast: Harrison Ford, Sean Young

Crew: Ridley Scott (Director), Jordan Cronenweth (Director of Photography), Vangelis Papathanassiou (Music Director)

Rating: A (India)

Genres: Sci-Fi, Thriller

Release Dates: 25 Jun 1982 (India)

Tagline: A chilling, bold, mesmerizing, futuristic detective thriller.

English Name: Blade Runner

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Did you know? Ridley Scott and Jordan Cronenweth achieved the famous 'shining eyes' effect by using a technique invented by 'Fritz Lang' known as the 'Schüfftan Process'; light is bounced into the actors' eyes off a piece of half mirrored glass mounted at a forty five degree angle to the camera. Read More
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Executive Producer
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Film Type:
Feature Film
Colour Info:
Sound Mix:
6-Track 70mm
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1
A chilling, bold, mesmerizing, futuristic detective thriller.
Man Has Made His Match... Now It's His Problem
Revealing Mistakes
Support cables for spinner are clearly visible in the shot where Deckard and Gaff take off after Gaff has told Deckard that Bryant wants to see him (corrected in the 2007 "Final Cut" of the movie; the wires have been digitally removed).

Revealing Mistakes
When Roy Batty, and Leon enter "Eye World" to interrogate Hannibal Chew, the environment is supposed to be so cold that it will kill Hannibal without his protective suit, yet there is water dripping from the icicles on the ceiling.

Crew/Equipment Visible
When Deckard is being chased by Batty through the Bradbury building, there are two shadows visible on a wall; the shadows belong to director Ridley Scott and cinematographer Jordan Cronenweth (this has been corrected for the 2007 Final Cut; the shadows have been digitally removed).

Crew/Equipment Visible
Roy Batty and Leon enter "Eye World" to interrogate Hannibal Chew. As the sliding door to the room opens, you can clearly see a set lighting stand leg in the lower left of the opening. This was not caught in the newest version of the film.

When we see Zhora getting dressed after her shower, her boots have high heels. However, when Deckard is chasing her the heels are flat. This is most obvious when she rolls over after he shoots her.

Character Error
The sheet music that Rachael reads does not match the song that she plays on the piano (not least because it is for guitar). She could, of course, be playing from memory and not referring to the music at all.

Deckard's instructions to the Esper seem to bear little relation to what the machine is actually doing as it navigates the photograph.

When Deckard and Bryant are reviewing the video from Leon's VK empathy test, the dialogue between Leon and Holden is not as fast as it was in the original scene. In addition, Leon is heard to say "Uh..." prior to identifying his hotel room number, which he does not do in the earlier version of the scene.

When we see Deckard waiting for his noodles, he is reading that day's newspaper. Later in Leon's apartment, the same newspaper is seen in one of the drawers, except it is old and soiled, as if it has been there for years. We know they are the same since both newspapers have the same headline about farming on the moon.

In the opening interview with Leon, Leon states: "Let me tell you about my mother..." Later, when Deckard is thinking about the interview (as he drives through the tunnel) Leon is heard saying "I'll tell you about my mother..." This could be attributed to Deckard simply remembering the dialogue incorrectly.

Audio/Video Mismatch
The note that Deckard plays on the grand piano is not the note we hear.

Audio/Video Mismatch
When Deckard asks Racheal if Tyrel's owl is artificial, she replies "Of course it is." However, her lips movements do not match what we hear. This is because when the scene was filmed, actress Sean Young answered the question by saying "Of course not." Director Ridley Scott changed this in post-production because he wanted to establish that Tyrell could make perfect imitations of living things.

Audio/Video Mismatch
When Deckard is talking to the snake vendor. You can see through the glass that each characters dialog does not match their mouth movements. This is true in all versions of the film, except the Workprint. Even in 2007 "Final Cut", the obviousness of the error has been reduced, but if you look closely, you can still see that the audio doesn't quite match the visual.

Audio/Video Mismatch
When Rachael is playing, the keys she presses don't match the music we hear. The piano sound is in C major, but the picture shows her pressing black keys.

Audio/Video Mismatch
When Sebastian is talking to Batty about his chess game with Tyrell, the shot is focused on Batty, but Sebastian's chin and lower lip are visible, and you can see that it does not move in sync with the words you can hear him saying.
Joanna Cassidy (Zhora) was at ease with the snake around her neck because it was her pet, a Burmese python named Darling.

Ridley Scott cast Rutger Hauer in the role of Roy Batty without actually meeting the actor. He had watched his performances in Turkish Delight (1973), Keetje Tippel (1975) and Soldier of Orange (1977) and was so impressed, he cast him immediately. However, for their first meeting, Hauer decided to play a joke on Scott and he turned up wearing huge green sunglasses, pink satin pants and a white sweater with an image of a fox on the front. According to production executive Katherine Haber, when Scott saw Hauer, he literally turned white.

Ridley Scott and Jordan Cronenweth achieved the famous 'shining eyes' effect by using a technique invented by 'Fritz Lang' known as the 'Schüfftan Process'; light is bounced into the actors' eyes off a piece of half mirrored glass mounted at a forty five degree angle to the camera.

According to Paul Sammon, who toured the set in 1981, the level of detail on everything (what Ridley Scott refers to as 'layering') was amazing, even though much of it would never be seen on screen. For example, written on the door of a bus was "Driver is Armed; Carries No Cash", whilst written in tiny print on the parking meters was "WARNING - DANGER! You Can Be Killed By Internal Electrical System If This Meter Is Tampered With".

When Deckard (Harrison Ford) stops Rachael (Sean Young) from leaving his apartment, he pushes her away from him. The expression of pain and shock on her face was real. She said Ford pushed her too hard and she was angry with him.

After Pris (Daryl Hannah) first meets Sebastian (William Sanderson), she runs away from him, skidding into his car and smashing the window with her elbow. This was a genuine mistake caused by Hannah slipping on the wet ground. The glass wasn't breakaway glass, it was real glass, and Hannah chipped her elbow in eight places.

Although Philip K. Dick saw only the opening 20 minutes of footage prior to his death on March 2, 1982, he was extremely impressed, and has been quoted by Paul Sammon as saying, "It was my own interior world. They caught it perfectly." However neither Ridley Scott nor screenwriter David Webb Peoples actually read Dick's novel.

Ridley Scott's first cut ran four hours.

The 'snake scale' seen under the electron microscope was actually a marijuana bud.

Rutger Hauer came up with many inventive ideas for his characterization, like the moment where he grabs and fondles a dove. He also improvised the now-iconic line "All those moments will be lost in time... like tears in the rain".

The screenplay of this movie, written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, is a modified film adaptation of the 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.
Movie Connection(s):
Followed by: Blade Runner 2 (English)