The Wolfman (2010)

 ●  English ● Running Time: TBA

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Though absent from his ancestral home of Blackmoor for many years, aristocrat Lawrence Talbot (Benicio Del Toro) returns to find his missing brother at the request of the latter's fiancee, Gwen (Emily Blunt). He learns that a creature has links to an ancient curse turning people into werewolves when the moon is full. To save the village and protect Gwen, he must slay the bloodthirsty beast, but he contends with a horrifying family legacy.

Cast: Emily Blunt, Gemma Whelan, Simon Merrells

Crew: Joe Johnston (Director), Shelly Johnson (Director of Photography), Danny Elfman (Music Director)

Genres: Drama, Horror, Thriller

Release Dates: 12 Feb 2010 (India)

Tagline: When the moon is full the legend comes to life

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Did you know? Rick Baker had based his design of the Wolfman of Jack P. Pierce's design on the original The Wolf Man (1941), and also on wolves and apes in books and his old dog Boscoe which he done his first Academy Award winning work for An American Werewolf in London (1981). Read More
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as Gwen Conliffe
as Gwen's Maid
as Ben Talbot
as Sir John Talbot
as Hoenneger
as Singh
as Young Ben
as Asylum Orderly
as Lawrence Talbot
as MacQueen
as Solana
as Gypsy Man
as Custodian
as Constable Nye
as Kirk
as Bear Handler
as Little Gypsy Girl
as Maleva
as Aberline
as Creepy Guard
as Police Officer 2
as Gypsy Mother
as Asylum Doctor 1
as Wolf Boy
as Kirk
as Lloyd
as Colonel Montford
as Young Gypsy Woman
as Gypsy Boy
as Asylum Doctor 2
as Gypsy Man
as Squire Strickland
as Reverend Fisk
as Carter

Direction

Director
First Assistant Director
Second Assistant Director

Writers

Screenplay Writer

Camera and Electrical

Director of Photography
Still Photographer
Gaffer

Music

Music Director
Music Editor

Sound

Foley Artist
Sound Effects Editor
Sound Mixer
Boom Operator

Animation

Art

Art Director
Production Designer
Prop Master
Storyboard Artist
Assistant Props Master

Casting

Casting Director

Costume and Wardrobe

Costume Designer

Editorial

Assistant Editor

Stunts

Stunt Coordinator

Visual Effects

Visual Effects Supervisor
Visual Effects Studio
Visual Effects Coordinator
Film Type:
Feature Film
Language:
English
Colour Info:
Color
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1
Stereoscopy:
No
Taglines:
When the moon is full the legend comes to life
The Legend Is Alive
Fear What Is Within
Goofs:
Revealing Mistakes
When Sir John Talbot is blowing out candles, they are clearly filament lamps, as the third candle lamp actually goes out before he blows on it.

Miscellaneous
When Lawrence Talbot is walking back to Talbot Hall, he passes a tablet that states it is 16 miles to Blackmoor. In 1891, the metric system was not yet popular in Europe. Even in 2014, much of Britain still holds out on the metric system in favour of imperial measurements (miles, yards etc.) for distances.

Miscellaneous
In Gwen's antique shop there is what seems to be a small replica of Auguste Rodin's "The Thinker," which was first created around 1902. However, upon closer inspection this statue, while sharing the same position as the Thinker, is dressed and notably less muscular than Rodin's statue.

Factual Mistake
Sir John claims to have removed the gunpowder from the silver bullet 4 bore cartridges. However, he had not removed the primers, thus there would not have been a mere click from the falling hammers but a most definite bang from the primers. Furthermore, in some calibers the pressure from the primers may actually be enough to propel the bullets even without gunpowder.

Miscellaneous
Tower Bridge, which opened in 1894, is seen operating during the film, which is set in 1891.

Miscellaneous
One of the topiary animals is a mountain gorilla. These great apes weren't discovered until 1902.

Miscellaneous
When Talbot is first in Gwen Conliffe's shop in London. There is a vase of flowers containing Stargazer lilies. The Stargazer lily was created in 1978 by Leslie Woodriff.

Miscellaneous
When Talbot enters Gwen Conliffe's shop, we see that the door has a flower design inspired by Charles Rennie Mackintosh after 1896.

Character Error
Gwen regrets getting Lawrence involved, saying that if she had never sent him that letter, he would still be in New York. She sent Lawrence a letter when Ben went missing in the theatrical version, but in the extended cut she went to tell him in person instead. Yet the "letter" line is retained in both versions even though it doesn't make sense in the latter.

Character Error
Sir John describes St. Columbanus as a gypsy from the East, but in fact St. Columbanus was Irish and founded one of the first monasteries in Scotland (on Iona island), one of the most important in Christendom.

Continuity
In the asylum, Lawrence is dunked in a large ice tank. When he's brought back to the surface, he has two chucks of ice on him that fall off leaving none, but when the scene cuts to him being raised and locked upright, suddenly there's a chunk of ice on his right arm.

Factual Mistake
The language spoken by the Romani (gypsies) in the film is actually Romanian. In reality, the Romani language is completely different from Romanian. It is actually more similar to Hindi, and has many various dialects depending on the area of origin.

Miscellaneous
In Gwen's antique shop there is what seems to be a small replica of Auguste Rodin's "The Thinker," which was first created around 1902. However, upon closer inspection this statue, while sharing the same position as the Thinker, is dressed and notably less muscular than Rodin's statue.

Miscellaneous
When Lawrence Talbot is walking back to Talbot Hall, he passes a tablet that states it is 16 miles to Blackmoor. In 1891, the metric system was not yet popular in Europe. Even in 2014, much of Britain still holds out on the metric system in favour of imperial measurements (miles, yards etc.) for distances.
Trivia:
Benicio Del Toro is a huge fan of the original film, and remained attached to the remake ever since it was first announced in 2006 and passed through the hands of several directors.

Many actors, including Gene Simmons and David Lee Roth, were called in to do the Wolfman's howls.

Was at first slated to hit cinemas in 2007, but difficulties to find a director made this release date impossible. Then a new release date was set for February 2009, then November 2009 and then finally February 2010.

Costume designer, Milena Canonero based The Wolfman costume on the werewolf's (Oliver Reed) costume in The Curse of the Werewolf (1961). Most noticeable between the two is the open shirt.

The way Sir John plays the harmonica while walking through the halls of the asylum was Anthony Hopkins' idea.

This movie's story was made into a theme for a haunted house at Universal's "Halloween Horror Nights" in Orlando Florida.

Inspector Francis Abberline is based on Frederick Abberline, a Scotland Yard Inspector that investigated London's 'Jack the Ripper' murders in 1888, a case which is alluded to in the film. This fantasy version of him very much resembles the one in From Hell (2001).

This is the second remake of a Universal monster movie involving Anthony Hopkins. His first was Francis Ford Coppola's remake of Dracula (1992) as the vampire hunter Professor Abraham Van Helsing.

Robert Rodriguez described the long hair Benicio Del Toro used to play Jackie Boy in Sin City (2005) as "Wolf Man hair".

Danny Elfman was the original composer on the film and recorded a complete score inspired by Wojciech Kilar's score for Francis Ford Coppola's Dracula (1992). His score was rejected as it did not fit the new tone of the film after several re-shoots and delays. Paul Haslinger was supposed to replace him, but Universal pulled the plug on that, and decided to re-instate Elfman's gothic score.

The extended cut of the film begins with the Universal Pictures logo that was being used in 1941, when the original The Wolf Man (1941) came out, but the original fanfare theme is not heard.

Joe Johnston signed on to make the film three weeks ahead of principal photography. This late start was one of the main reasons why he employed CGI in the werewolf transformations as there simply wasn't time to design new make-up effects.

Among the numerous directors in line to take up the position after Mark Romanek's departure were Brett Ratner, Frank Darabont, James Mangold, Bill Condon, Martin Campbell and, the ultimate choice, Joe Johnston.

One scene involving frozen corpses was shot in the village of Lacock in Wiltshire which is conserved by Britain's National Trust organization. Universal donated £5000 to the Trust in return for letting them film there.

Benicio Del Toro's Wolfman make-up took approximately 3 hours to apply and 1 hour to remove.

Rick Baker had based his design of the Wolfman of Jack P. Pierce's design on the original The Wolf Man (1941), and also on wolves and apes in books and his old dog Boscoe which he done his first Academy Award winning work for An American Werewolf in London (1981).

This is the first film Joe Johnston has directed to be rated R.

The bear owned by the gypsies is actually recycled animation from The Golden Compass (2007). The Polar Bear was changed into a Grizzly for this film.

This is one of just two werewolf films to win the Academy Award for Best Makeup (awarded in 2011 to Rick Baker and Dave Elsey). The first was An American Werewolf in London (1981) also given to Baker.

This is Benicio Del Toro's second time playing a "wolfman". His very first feature film role was that of a "dog-faced boy" in Pee Wee Herman's Big Top Pee-wee (1988) (which its music was also scored by Danny Elfman).

When Rick Baker, who became a makeup artist because of films like The Wolf Man (1941), heard that this film was being made he was working on the Universal film Norbit (2007), he went into an executive's office to tell them he had to do the makeup.

Lawrence Talbot is haunted by memories of his mother's death when he was young. Benicio Del Toro's own mother died when he was nine.