The Darjeeling Limited (2007)

 ●  English ● 1 hr 31 mins

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Set against the colourful and richly cultural backdrop of India, this evocative drama delves into concepts of family, unity, love and understanding, through a journey set upon by three brothers. One year after their father's death, this family-oriented drama delves into the efforts of the eldest brother Wilson, to reconnect with his two younger siblings, by taking them on a train trip across the vibrant and sensual landscape of India.
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Did you know? The abbey towards the end of the film was originally a royal hunting lodge belonging to the Maharana of Mewar in the Rajput era. It is located in Udaipur. To redecorate it, production designer Mark Friedberg was inspired by Michael Powell's Black Narcissus which takes place in an abbey in the Himalayas. Read More
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Direction

Director
First Assistant Director
Second Unit Director

Camera and Electrical

Director of Photography

Music

Music Coordinator

Art

Art Director
Production Designer
Associate Art Director

Costume and Wardrobe

Costume Designer

Editorial

Makeup and Hair

Makeup Artist
Film Type:
Feature Film
Language:
English
Colour Info:
Color
Sound Mix:
Dolby Digital, DTS, Sony Dynamic Digital Sound
Camera:
Panavision Panaflex
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1
Stereoscopy:
No
Goofs:
Continuity
When Peter is reading Jack's short story on the train, in the first shot he is reading the first page. In the next shot, he is reading a different page (the page has been turned to hide the paper clip that is holding the story together), in the next shot, the first page is showing again and has not been folded back.

Continuity
When Peter throws the belt at Francis in the train cabin, he has shaving lather on his face. But when Francis retaliates immediately after, the lather is gone.

Continuity
When Jack is smoking out the window of the train, Rita's cigarette changes lengths. When we first see her it is just a butt, but the next cut shows a full cigarette.

Continuity
When the brothers are in the dining car the first time, the camera cuts between Francis and Peter several times. In the shots of Francis we can see the back of Peter's head and that his fingers are on his temples. However, when the camera is facing him they are gone (it all happens too fast for him to have moved his hands up and down).

Continuity
When we're first introduced to Jack's iPod, it's a 3rd generation iPod with no click wheel. Few moments later, a click-wheel iPod is in its place.

Continuity
Around 27 minutes into the movie, a scene is shown from Jodhpur, as one can see "The Umed Palace", this is not possible as the train is shown leaving Jodhpur in the beginning of the movie.

Continuity
At the end when they are trying to catch the train and throwing the bags away they are running on sand, when they are on the train and looking back, the bags are lying on the platform made of tarmac.

Continuity
When Peter is running for the train, he has two pieces of luggage. While walking through the train, he has 3 pieces.

Continuity
When the train attendant brings the Whitman's lemonade, Francis and Jack take two out of the three glasses she's carrying on her tray. She then leans towards Jack to apply a bindi mark on his forehead and two glasses full of lemonade are visible on the tray (whereas there should be only one left).

Factual Mistake
In the dining car scene, Peter is reading Jack's short story, Luftwaffe Automotive. The story is written on stationary from the Hotel Chevalier, in Paris. The logo of the French flag on the stationary is incorrect; from right to left, the colors are red, white, and blue. The French flag is blue, white, and red.

Factual Mistake
During the preparation of the dead boy funeral, there's a scene when Francis is lying down with a boy in a blue shirt kneeling beside him, and the camera travels to Peter holding a baby between two Indian locals. During 13 seconds, a Muslim call-to-prayer ("adhan") is heard, very neatly during 5 seconds. However, the boy's body is cremated the Hindu way.

Factual Mistake
It is impossible for a train to be "lost" on Indian Railways. It is SOP to default switches on mainline routes to "trunk" positions. All unsignaled turnouts lead to dead-ends and have to be positively signaled for a train to be advanced down the track. A mistake (or a series of mistakes even) will not get the train more than a couple of kilometers before it derails on an auto-stop or dead-ends.
Trivia:
Natalie Portman, who appeared in a cameo, traveled to the film's location in Jodhpur, India, to shoot for about half an hour and then spent 10 days exploring India afterward.

Feature film debut of Amara Karan, who plays Rita. While she was still being considered for the role, Karan received the script and discovered that Rita smokes cigarettes. Not being a smoker, she enlisted some friends to help her practice smoking. During a meeting with Wes Anderson, Karan casually tossed a cigarette into her mouth and started smoking: "I am sure it must have looked really spontaneous." Anderson did not waste any time before asking her if she would come aboard.

Wes Anderson said that part of his inspiration for The Darjeeling Limited was The River, and more specifically that he owes a debt of gratitude to Martin Scorsese for screening the film personally for him.

Director Wes Anderson chose not to have an original score for his film, opting, instead, to borrow original music from Indian films including those from legendary Indian auteur Satyajit Ray's films.

In order to achieve a constant limp while filming, Owen Wilson placed a small lime in his shoe.

Most of the props used on the train sets were handmade or decorated, including the entire dining room set.

The character of Vladimir Wolodarsky in Wes Anderson's The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, was named after Wallace Wolodarsky, who played Brendan.

Throughout the whole movie, none of the characters actually smoke a full cigarette.

The 11 suitcases seen in the movie are created by Marc Jacobs for Louis Vuitton and they are decorated with giraffes, rhinoceros and antelopes designed by Eric Chase Anderson, the director's brother. They all have the initials JLW.

Towards the end of the film, on the train "Bengal Lancer", the painted portrait on the wall of the compartment is of director Satyajit Ray.

Bipasha Basu rejected a role in "The Darjeeling Limited" because she feels the need to act in roles where she is not stereotyped as a typical Indian.

Adrien Brody is the only one of the three leads to not have been in a Wes Anderson movie prior to this. Jason Schwartzman was in Rushmore while Owen Wilson has participated in some way to every Anderson feature film.

The film was mostly shot in the Rajasthani desert, in northwest India.

There are no such trains as The Darjeeling Limited or The Bengal Lancer in India.

The abbey towards the end of the film was originally a royal hunting lodge belonging to the Maharana of Mewar in the Rajput era. It is located in Udaipur. To redecorate it, production designer Mark Friedberg was inspired by Michael Powell's Black Narcissus which takes place in an abbey in the Himalayas.

Wes Anderson had never been to India prior to May 2006, when he went there to polish his script.

Adrien Brody remarked that during the river scene, Wes Anderson's instructions were the exact opposite of what he had intended to do, making the scene sadder in his opinion.

Though no such train actually exists, The Darjeeling Limited was still filmed inside a moving train which went from Jodhpur to Jaisalmer and through the Thar desert, and proved a daily challenge for cinematographer Robert D. Yeoman as nothing could be fixed to the ceiling and filming equipment couldn't be more than a meter out of the windows. To achieve this, Wes Anderson and production designer Mark Friedberg went to see the Northwestern Railways company and told them they needed ten rail-cars and a locomotive which they would redecorate entirely and then move around their railway. This was the first time Northwestern Railways received such a request, and though it took a lot time and effort, it was eventually evidently granted.

In creating the look of the train, production designer Mark Friedberg inspired himself partly from the 20th Century Limited, a train which linked New York to Chicago from 1902 to 1967.

The third collaboration between Wes Anderson and Anjelica Huston after The Royal Tenenbaums and The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou

The fourth collaboration between Wes Anderson and Bill Murray after Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums and The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou.

Wes Anderson cites the following as influences on him for this film: Jean Renoir's The River, the films of Satyajit Ray and the Indian documentaries made by Louis Malle.

The film is dedicated to Satyajit Ray.

The character that Owen Wilson plays in the film is suspected of an abortive suicide attempt. Ironically, when the film was released, Wilson pulled out of all press duties following a real-life suicide attempt.

Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola and Jason Schwartzman organically wrote the screenplay as they traveled around India together.

The role of Peter was written with Adrien Brody specifically in mind.

The three lead actors applied their own make-up each morning.

After completing the screenplay's first draft, Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola and Jason Schwartzman all visited India together to see if the fictional world they'd created meshed with the real thing. Although the changes made subsequently were relatively minor, much of the dialog was excised from the later passages of the film as Wes Anderson wanted India's only natural beauty to speak for itself.

The three brothers - Francis, Peter and Jack - are actually named after Francis Ford Coppola, Peter Bogdanovich and Jack Nicholson.

The house into which the dead boy is brought, was not supposed to be blue, but rather have the same natural red color as the others. It was painted blue by a member of the village during the course of time from which it was selected until the crew returned. Anderson chose to use it anyway.