Princess Mononoke (1997)

 ●  English ● 2 hrs 14 mins

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While protecting his village from rampaging boar-god/demon, a confident young warrior, Ashitaka, is stricken by a deadly curse. To save his life, he must journey to the forests of the west. Once there, he's embroiled in a fierce campaign that humans were waging on the forest. The ambitious Lady Eboshi and her loyal clan use their guns against the gods of the forest and a brave young woman, Princess Mononoke, who was raised by a wolf-god. Ashitaka sees the good in both sides and tries to stem the flood of blood. This is met be animosity by both sides as they each see him as supporting the enemy.
See Storyline (May Contain Spoilers)

Cast: Yoji Matsuda, Yuriko Ishida

Crew: Hayao Miyazaki (Director), Atsushi Okui (Director of Photography), Joe Hisaishi (Music Director)

Genres: Adventure, Animation, Fantasy

Release Dates: 12 Jul 1997 (India)

Tagline: The Fate Of The World Rests On The Courage Of One Warrior.

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Music Rating
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Did you know? Director Hayao Miyazaki personally corrected or redrew more than 80,000 of the film's 144,000 animation cels. Read More
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as Ashitaka
as San / Mononoke-Hime
as Moro-no-kimi
as Usi-kai
as Okkoto-nusi
as Tatara's Women Song
Supporting Actor
as Jiko-bô
as Jibashiri
Supporting Actor
as Kouroku
as Hii-sama
as Toki
as Woman in Iron Town
as Yama-inu
as Eboshi-gozen

Direction

Director
Associate Director
Assistant Director

Production

Producer
Executive Producer
Associate Producer
Assistant Producer

Writers

Story Writer

Camera and Electrical

Director of Photography

Music

Music Director

Sound

Foley Editor
Sound Re-recording Mixer
Sound Effects Editor

Editorial

Film Type:
Feature Film
Language:
English
Colour Info:
Color
Sound Mix:
Dolby, Dolby Digital
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1
Stereoscopy:
No
Taglines:
The Fate Of The World Rests On The Courage Of One Warrior.
Goofs:
Character Error
When Ashitaka first visits the Forest Spirits home, he spots the Spirit's traces (shape of his hooves) underneath the water surface. But later in the movie, it proves that the Spirit only walks on the water surface.

Continuity
When Ashitaka spots San for the first time at the river spitting out a mouthful of Moro no Kimi's blood from the bullet wound in her chest, the number of large wolf teeth on San's necklace changes from four, to three, back to four.

Continuity
While Eboshi and Jigo are speaking to each other in Irontown, Captain Gonza is seen standing directly behind Eboshi. The next scene shows a close-up of Jigo. The scene after that pans back to Eboshi and shows Gonza has been replaced with a man in a hat.

Continuity
When San receives the crystal dagger necklace from Ashitaka she ties it on and it is visibly separate from her wolf tooth necklace. A few moments later when she climbs onto the back of one of the wolves, the crystal dagger is part of the wolf teeth necklace and is not on a separate cord. Later in the movie the two necklaces are separate again.

Continuity
After Ashitaka is shot through the chest, San rides with him on the back of his red deer Yakul, and blood from his wound is seen on Yakul's back. The blood stain disappears after Ashitaka falls to the ground.

Continuity
When Ashitaka swims to Iron Town during the battle, there is a shot of the water. In the next shot there is a floating corpse not visible in the previous shot.
Trivia:
Director Hayao Miyazaki personally corrected or redrew more than 80,000 of the film's 144,000 animation cels.

Japanese mythology tells that dogs/wolves are always male-voiced, and cats are always female-voiced, regardless of sex. For this reason, a man, Akihiro Miwa provides the voice of Moro the mother wolf. His casting is perhaps an in-joke to his career as a female impersonator.

Hayao Miyazaki had intended to this be be his final film before retiring. Its great success led him to do another, Spirited Away (2001). He made some more films in the years after that.

Princess Mononoke (1997) replaced E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982) as the biggest grossing film of all time in Japan until Titanic (1997).

Mononoke means angry or vengeful spirit. Hime is the Japanese honorific word that means princess, which, in the rules of Japanese grammar, is placed after a person's name instead of before, as is the custom in many Western languages. When the film's title was translated into English, it was decided that Mononoke would be left as a name rather than translated literally.

With a runtime of 134 minutes (2 hour and 14 minutes), it is the second longest animated film ever made after Final Yamato (1983) (165 minutes).

This is the last major animated motion picture to be filmed on plastic animation cels.

When it was announced that the Miramax/Buena Vista region-1 DVD would only contain the English-language dialogue track adapted by Neil Gaiman, there was enough fan protest to convince Miramax to delay the release in order to include the original Japanese-language dialogue.

Produced for about 2.35 billion Japanese Yen (approximately US$23.5 million) it was the most expensive anime ever made at the time of its release.

Leonardo DiCaprio was originally considered for the part of Ashitaka.

Disney/Miramax, which released the film in North America, was contractually obligated not to edit any footage out for its North American release. They asked to, but were refused. Although they kept their end of the bargain in not editing the film, they did release it into far fewer theaters than promised and expressed surprise that it had made little money at the box office.