Les Miserables (2013)

 ●  English ● 2 hrs 39 mins

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Based on the novel by Victor Hugo, 'Les Miserables' travels with prisoner-on-parole, 24601, Jean Valjean, as he runs from the ruthless Inspector Javert on a journey beyond the barricades, at the center of the June Rebellion. Meanwhile, the life of a working class girl with a child is at turning point as she turns to prostitution to pay money to the evil innkeeper and his wife who look after her child, Cosette. Valjean promises to take care of the child, eventually leads to a love triangle between Cosette, Marius who is a student of the rebellion, and Eponine, a girl of the streets. The people sing of their anger and Enjolras leads the students to fight upon the barricades.
See Storyline (May Contain Spoilers)

Cast: Amanda Seyfried, Anne Hathaway, Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe

Crew: Tom Hooper (Director), Danny Cohen (Director of Photography), Claude-Michel Schonberg (Music Director)

Rating: A (India)

Genres: Drama, Musical, Romance

Release Dates: 18 Jan 2013 (India)

Tagline: Fight. Dream. Hope. Love.

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Did you know? Hugh Jackman went 36 hours without water, causing him to lose water weight around his eyes and cheeks, giving him the gaunt appearance of a prisoner. Read More
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Film Type:
Feature Film
Language:
English
Colour Info:
Color
Sound Mix:
Datasat Digital Sound, Dolby Digital, Sony Dynamic Digital Sound
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1
Stereoscopy:
No
Archival Source:
QubeVault (Real Image Media Technologies) [Digital]
Taglines:
Fight. Dream. Hope. Love.
The Dream Lives This Christmas
Goofs:
Continuity
When Gavroche is shot and killed at the barricade, his eyes are open. When he is carried away from the barricades, his eyes are already shut. But when he is laid in a row with the other dead students for Javert's inspection, his eyes are open again.

Continuity
In "At the End of the Day" when all the women quickly form two rows the positioning of Fantine and the factory women standing on either side of her changes about three times.

Continuity
When we first see Enjolras speaking before the crowd during "Look Down", he and Marius are holding pamphlets in their hands. When Enjolras sings his line "Where is the king who runs this show?", he raises his hand above his head and the camera does a quick cut for a close up -- revealing that the pamphlet has vanished from his hands.

Continuity
When Valjean gets down on one knee to tell Cosette of her mother's fate, he appears to reach up and take his hat off. When the camera goes from Cosette back to Jean, his hat is still sitting on top of his head.

Continuity
During the final scene, the sky changes between shots from being cloudy to having few or no clouds.

Continuity
When Gavroche first comes up from inside the elephant, he is wearing only a blue jacket. In the next shot, He is wearing a brown blanket. In the shot after that, it has disappeared again.

Continuity
When Javert arrives back at the barricade, the gun disappears and reappears in his hand.

Continuity
During "The Robbery", Thernardier speaks to Javert and grows nearer and nearer to his face. The shot changes, however, and shows Javert at a different angle, moving closer to Thernardier.

Continuity
During the opening scene at the docks, the sun keeps changing between shots.

Revealing Mistakes
Very near the end of the song "Stars," a shot from behind Javert shows he is facing Notre Dame and the moon is in the sky to his right. Although the moon is to his right and illuminates buildings in the background from that perspective, the light reflected off of Javert's forehead is coming from his left.
Trivia:
Hugh Jackman personally lobbied for Anne Hathaway to get the role of Fantine after the two performed together at the Academy Awards.

Due to the physical demands of daily singing, none of the cast was allowed alcohol. Russell Crowe and Amanda Seyfried both admitted it was a challenge to not be able to drink, and Crowe bought Seyfried a bottle of whiskey as a present after filming wrapped.

Anne Hathaway refuses to discuss how she lost 25 pounds to play the dying Fantine, as she admits her methods were life threatening, and doesn't want to glamorize or promote her methods to young women. However, she has confirmed eating oatmeal paste as one of the reasons of her weight loss.

The film was going to be 4 hours long, with a 15-minute battle. But, it was shortened to 2 and a half hours. 15 minutes of the final film were cut out.

Amanda Seyfried said in an interview that it took over four months of auditioning to get the part of Cosette. She was entirely unaware of the other young women auditioning/ being considered for the role, but she was constantly told that she was "not right" for this musical/film. During the audition process, Seyfried was also singing/reading for the role of Fantine, and forced herself to get into vocal and physical shape for strong consideration for either one of the roles. When Anne Hathaway signed on as Fantine, Seyfried was given the role of Cosette.

Hayden Panettiere, Scarlett Johansson, Lea Michele, Emily Browning, Lucy Hale and Evan Rachel Wood auditioned for the role of Eponine, before it was rumored that Taylor Swift had been offered the role. In the end, Samantha Barks was cast.

Coincidentally, Anne Hathaway sang with Hugh Jackman at the Academy Awards (twice). The second time, Hathaway was hosting and sang 'On My Own' to Jackman because Jackman refused to sing with her. Later, Jackman was cast in this movie and he suggested Hathaway as Fantine. She was later cast.

Hugh Jackman went 36 hours without water, causing him to lose water weight around his eyes and cheeks, giving him the gaunt appearance of a prisoner.

Fantine's assault by a rejected customer is based on an actual incident from Victor Hugo's life that resulted in Fantine's creation: he was on his way to his editor's office when he encountered a young man harassing a prostitute. When she rejected his advances, he shoved a handful of snow down her dress and shoved her to the ground. When she defended herself with her fists, he immediately called the police to arrest his "assailant". Hugo was a minor celebrity at the time and spoke up on the woman's behalf when the police arrived and was able to have her set free. Hugo said he was horrified by the unfairness of the woman's situation and began to imagine that she might have children depending on her, and thus Fantine appeared in his mind.

Recording the actors' singing live as they're acting may not be a first for this film, but the scope, and especially the manner in which it's being done, is: The actors wore ear pieces which fed the sound of a live piano being played off-stage, to keep their singing in key. The main novelty here is, there's no count-in or predetermined tempo and the piano is following the pacing of the actor, not the other way around - a first for a filmed musical. Orchestral music was added post-production.

Typically, the soundtrack for a movie musical is recorded several months in advance and the actors mime to playback during filming. However, on this film, every single song was recorded live on set to capture the spontaneity of the performances. Everyone involved, from Hugh Jackman to Russell Crowe to producer Cameron Mackintosh, have praised this approach as it allowed them to concentrate on their acting as opposed to lip-syncing properly. They have also praised director Tom Hooper for attempting this on such a scale; something no director has ever done before.

Amanda Seyfried also played young Cosette before, when she was 7 years old in a concert.

Anne Hathaway actually cut her hair very short for this movie, in a scene where her character sells her hair.

While it seems odd, the "coffin" to which Fantine takes her first "john" is really the type of bed used by poorer people at that time. The raised sides helped to keep the sleeper warm. People who were better off either had bed curtains on all sides or slept in a small partition with curtains that could be closed to hold in the heat.

Eddie Redmayne's audition was on his iPhone. He recorded himself singing in a trailer during a movie break in North Carolina.

Hugh Jackman lost considerable weight and grew a real scraggly beard for scenes of Valjean as a prisoner, though mercifully they were shot first in production and he could shave and return to his usual weight for scenes playing Valjean as a wealthy man.