Finding Neverland (2004)

 ●  English ● 1 hr 46 mins

Where did you watch this movie?

Embedded with awesome fantasy and poignant reality, this semi-biographical saga revolves around a floundering writer, J.M. Barrie who desperately seeks creative inspiration. It is then that he comes into contact with a family in dire straits that consists of a widow and her four children and develops a tremendously soulful connection with them. This magical saga touchingly traces the Scottish author's platonic relationship with Sylvia Llewelyn Davies, and his close friendship with her sons named George, Jack, Peter, and Michael, who inspire the classic play 'The Boy Who Never Grew Up'. The movie intricately depicts how Barrie slowly bonds with four children, who have no father. Drawing from his time with the kids, he writes a story about children who don't want to grow up, which turns into a sublimely beautiful and universally appealing children's classic, 'Peter Pan'.
See Storyline (May Contain Spoilers)

Cast: Johnny Depp, Kate Winslet

Crew: Marc Forster (Director), Roberto Schaefer (Director of Photography), Jan AP Kaczmarek (Music Director)

Genres: Drama, Family, Fantasy, Biography

Release Dates: 17 Dec 2004 (India)

Tagline: Unlock your imagination.

Movie Rating
Based on 0 rating
Music Rating
Based on 0 rating
Did you know? Marc Forster: one of the workers in the scene where J.M. Barrie (Johnny Depp) visits the costume room at the playhouse. Read More
No reviews available. Click here to add a review.
as Sir James Matthew Barrie
as Sylvia Llewelyn Davies
as Charles Frohman
Supporting Actress
as Peter Llewelyn Davies
Supporting Actor
as Jack Llewelyn Davies
as Mrs. Emma du Maurier
Supporting Actress
Supporting Actress
Supporting Actor
Supporting Actor
Supporting Actor
as Mary Ansell Barrie
Supporting Actress
Supporting Actor
Supporting Actor
Supporting Actor
Supporting Actor




Production Company
Executive Producer
Associate Producer




Screenplay Writer
Dialogue Writer

Camera and Electrical

Director of Photography
Still Photographer


Music Director
Music Editor


Sound Designer
Foley Editor
Sound Re-recording Mixer
Foley Artist
Boom Operator


Production Designer
Art Director
Prop Master
Set Decorator
Storyboard Artist


Casting Director
Casting Assistant

Costume and Wardrobe

Costume Designer


First Assistant Editor

Makeup and Hair

Makeup Artist
Hair Stylist

Special Effects

Special Effects Technician


Stunt Coordinator
Stunt Performer

Visual Effects

Visual Effects Producer
Digital Compositor
Film Type:
Feature Film
Colour Info:
Sound Mix:
Dolby Digital, Sony Dynamic Digital Sound
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1
Unlock your imagination.
How far can your imagination take you.
Where will your imagination take you?
Crew/Equipment Visible
When Peter is knocking over his set for his play, a man in a t-shirt, blue jeans and a baseball cap is reflected in the window.

Factual Mistake
There was much literary license taken regarding J.M. Barrie and his relationships with key characters. He and his wife didn't divorce until several years after the film's time period. Also, Sylvia's husband didn't die several years after the film; Sylvia didn't until 1910, six years after the Peter Pan premiere. Barrie knew the boys for several years before their apparent first meeting.

While they are watching the play in the Davies' home Michael goes from leaning onto his mother to sitting up straight to leaning on his mother again.

When J.M. Barrie is explaining the concept of the play to Frohman, there is a car approaching them from behind as they walk down the street. The position of the car changes dramatically between shots, though the continuity of the conversation is unchanged.

when Peter is knocking down the stage for his play he steps over the "sun", but in the next shot he grabs it from its spot leaning against a wall.

When the actors are doing the Peter Pan play in the Davies house, just before the wall comes up revealing Neverland, the actor playing Peter's hair is messy, but when she enters Neverland, her hair is neat and tidy.

The first scene of "Finding Neverland", is set in 1903, the opening night of James Barrie's play "Little Mary". The vehicle in which Mr & Mrs Snow arrive is a Rolls-Royce model 40/50 HP, also known as a "Silver Ghost". This is an anachronism. The Rolls-Royce company was formed in 1904, with production of the 40/50 HP started in 1907. Moreover, the car has a "Flying Lady" mascot on the radiator which was not designed by Charles Sykes until 1911. The specific car is identifiable from its registration number - BM 8794. It is chassis number 1979, which was delivered new on 10th May 1912. The car used to drive to the summer cottage is a Mitchell Tourer, made in Racine Wisconsin, USA. Although the Mitchell-Lewis Motor Company was founded in 1903, the model in the film appears to be about 1911, judging by the shape and style of the lettering on the radiator. It's certainly no earlier than 1910.

When J.M. Barrie is rebuffing Peter for saying Porthos is just a dog, the stuffed toys behind Peter change orientation in relation to Peter at least twice.

When J.M. gets out of the car when they are on their way to the cottage to shoo off the sheep, the road is muddy with puddles all around. When he gets back in the car, the road is perfectly fine.

Frohman's dog "changes" between two dogs throughout the film. In the scene where Frohman dances with his dog, the dog he dances with has a tinge of ginger in his hair, whereas before the dog did not.
Although J.M. Barrie requests 25 seats in his audience for the orphans, there are only 15 orphans credited in the cast.

The cowboys-and-Indians scene begins with a sign for the "Great Ormond Mining Co." This is a reference to the Great Ormond Street Hospital, which owns the rights to the play.

There were three scenes deleted from the film. Directly after filming these scenes, Johnny Depp told the director that they would end up deleting those scenes. He was right

Finding Neverland (2004) director Marc Forster decided to schedule one of Freddie Highmore 's toughest scenes (where he tears up a book and demolishes a playhouse) on his second day of filming, deliberately so other cast members could see the child act and change their attitude towards working with him.

Marc Forster: one of the workers in the scene where J.M. Barrie (Johnny Depp) visits the costume room at the playhouse.

At the end of the movie when J.M. Barrie is showing the play to Sylvia at her house, Peter Pan asked them to clap their hands to save Tinkerbelle. Julie Christie's reaction to this was to immediately start clapping. This was unplanned, and the children had no idea how to respond to it. The look of shock on their faces is real.

Dustin Hoffman has appeared in two films about "Peter Pan" (Hook (1991) and Finding Neverland (2004)). Following his appearance in "Hook", close friend and former roommate Gene Hackman began calling him "Hook" as a joke. The name stuck and his contemporaries call him by that nickname to this day.

According to producer Richard N. Gladstein, more than 50 directors passed on the project.

Johnny Depp was the first of the cast members to sign on to the film. Kate Winslet was next.

Dustin Hoffman has his hand in his jacket while being told the idea of the boy who would never grow up because he had cut the tip of his finger when a folding chair he was sitting in collapsed and the doctor ordered that his hand had to remain above his heart.

There were actually five Davies children. The fifth child (Nicholas "Nico" Llewelyn Davies) has a hard-to-notice spot in the play - he is part of the inspiration for Michael (Michael Nicholas Darling). Since he was very young and is not noticed by many people in the play anyway, he wasn't included in the film. His daughter does appear in the film, however. She is the woman in the scene that takes place after the first showing of Peter Pan. She says something like, "You're Peter Pan?" Her name is Laura Duguid.

This film was originally scheduled to be released in fall 2003, but Columbia Pictures, which had the rights to J.M. Barrie's play for their film Peter Pan (2003), refused to allow Miramax to use certain scenes from the play in Finding Neverland (2004) if it were released at the same time. Miramax agreed to delay the release of Finding Neverland (2004) by one year in exchange for the rights to use Barrie's words.

Johnny Depp was so impressed with the performance of Freddie Highmore during filming that when Depp was cast for Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005) he specifically requested Highmore to play the title character of Charlie.

When J.M. Barrie and the Llewelyn Davies family are traveling by buggy to Mary Ansell Barrie's (James's wife) cottage, a flock of sheep stops in front of the buggy and it is forced to stop. This is included in the film because the buggy is an original from the late 1800s and is not able to properly run. To make it go, it is pushed over the hill. To cover for it stopping suddenly at the base of the hill, director Marc Forster decided to have the sheep block the road.

In the film, Johnny Depp spies Dustin Hoffman's character reading through the Peter Pan playbill, mocking the character names. The original script, however, called for Dustin Hoffman to be dressed in Captain Hook's costume as he playfully read the playbill. Upon reading that scene, Dustin said to director Marc Forster, "I'm not being Hook (1991) again!" The script was then changed.

At the beginning of the movie, when J.M. Barrie is seen pacing the corridor outside the auditorium, the carpet under his feet is worn and thread bare, suggesting that many playwrights had paced there many times. This was inspired by the playwright Neil Simon who makes mention of it in his autobiography, which one of the films writers had read.

During the formal dinner scene, Johnny Depp placed a "fart machine" under Julie Christie's chair. He had a remote control that he used to trigger a fart sound from the device. The children are laughing more at that than from playing with the spoons.

As in the movie, it has been a tradition for a girl to play Peter Pan in stage productions.

In actuality (not the film), Peter Llewelyn Davies was not J.M. Barrie's inspiration for the Peter Pan character. His younger brother, Michael, was. Michael is also said to be Barrie's favorite of the children, not Peter. It is not certain why Barrie then chose to name the main character Peter. One idea why is because of his brothers, Peter behaved the most like an adult at a young age. Barrie wished he had more of a childhood, so he immortalized him as the symbol of youth.

During the opening scene most of the extras wanted to go through the left door so they could shake Dustin Hoffman's hand.