Amrit Manthan (1934)

 ●  Marathi ● 2 hrs 35 mins

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Shantaram's classic opens with a sensational low-angle circular track movement as Chandika cult followers meet in a dungeon of flickering lights and deep shadow. As the more rationalist King Krantivarma (Varde) banned human or animal sacrifices from the increasingly fanatical festivals dedicated to the goddess, the cult's high priest (Chandramohan/Date) orders the hapless Vishwagupta (Kelkar) to kill the king. He obeys but is then betrayed by the perfidious priest and caught. His son Madhavgupta (Mane) and daughter Sumitra (Apte) together with the princess (Tarkhad) and the people finally overthrow the priest. There are several famous scenes, including the twice-told legend of the churning of the seas, once by the priest to show how evil must be exorcised, and again by a good general to show how demons often appear disguised as gods. Although invoking divine intervention when Madhavgupta is about to be sacrificed, the film's strongly political thrust has the people rise in revolt.
See Storyline (May Contain Spoilers)

Cast: Chandramohan, Nalini Tarkhad

Crew: Rajaram Vankudre Shantaram (Director), Keshavrao Bhole (Music Director)

Release Dates: 01 Jan 1934 (India)

Marathi Name: अमृत मंथन

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Did you know? It is composer Bhole's first professional film. Fattelal and Damle are responsible for the art direction and the sound. Read More
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as High Priest
as Rajkumari / Rani Mohini
Supporting Actress

Direction

Music

Music Director
Lyricist
Playback Singer
Film Type:
Feature Film
Language:
Marathi
Colour Info:
Black & White
Sound Mix:
Mono
Frame Rate:
24 fps
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1
Stereoscopy:
No
01 
Music Director: Keshavrao Bhole
Playback Singer: Shanta Apte
02 
Music Director: Keshavrao Bhole
Playback Singer: Shanta Apte
Trivia:
This was the first Hindi talkie to successfully complete its silver jubilee at Krishna Talkies, Bombay, by running for 29 weeks.

This was a pathbreaking movie in the history of Indian cinema as director,V Shantaram became the first to use the telephoto lens for extreme close-ups of actor Chandra Mohan’s eyes who played the hypnotist, cult leader Rajguru.

It is composer Bhole's first professional film. Fattelal and Damle are responsible for the art direction and the sound.

Prabhat's first all-India hit introduced names later associated with several of the studio's productions, with screen debuts from both Date in the Marathi version and Chandramohan in the Hindi. Date perhaps gives his best performance ever, while Apte plays her first adult role.

The director, Shantaram had just returned from Germany and used several techniques from that expressionist cinema, including the systematic recourse to artificial light, even bleaching the film in places, and, in its most famous shot, the telephoto lens focused on the priest's right eye in his opening declaration.
Movie Connection(s):
Featured in: Celluloid Man (English)